Tribes complete plan to respond to missing, murdered Indigenous persons

{{featured_button_text}} .tnt-restrict-img-3a67ce55-ad4a-5c57-94ca-46fe93f9f0ce { max-width: 1660px; }

Shelly Fyant, chairwoman of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, has led CSKT as they expanded their resources and programs to enhance the community’s response to missing and murdered Indigenous people in the tribal community.

TOM BAUER, Missoulian Ashley Nerbovig

The Montana Missing Persons Clearinghouse is aware of about 166 active cases of missing people in the state. At least 28% involve an Indigenous person, despite Indigenous people comprising less than 7% of Montana’s overall population.

Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribal Council Member Ellie Bundy shared the missing persons data at a Thursday news conference announcing the completion of CSKT’s pilot project to enhance the community’s response to missing and murdered Indigenous persons.

The Tribal Community Response Plan involved at least 10 different agencies working under one policy, Bundy said.

The plan is structured to help law enforcement and tribal officials respond at a moment’s notice when the first call comes in, said Leif Johnson, acting U.S. Attorney for

View Source