These days, Capitol Hill townhomes aren't for living in. They're for lobbying.

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Just a few blocks from the U.S. Capitol, is a five-bedroom townhouse with an unobtrusive presence on New Jersey Ave S.E. To the casual observer, it looks like any other home in this quaint, historic neighborhood in Washington D.C. But this one has a small placard and doormat distinguishing it from the row of other residences.

The house is the property of the Allied Pilots Association, a union for American Airlines pilots. And inside, it’s an airplane fanatic’s dream. Several model planes and a mini-model engine are on display, and the walls are dotted with photos and artistic depictions of various aircrafts. On the downstairs couch, customized pillows bear the airport codes for the home base of the trade association’s in-house pilot lobbyists. There’s also a pillow each for the organization’s two contract lobbyists, Jack and Jim Albertine — one decorated with a first-class boarding pass to Vienna (for Jack), the other a first-class boarding pass to Rome (Jim’s).

The Allied Pilots Association bought the townhouse for about $1.8 million in February 2020, just before Covid-19 shut down Washington and the world. With the city now emerging from its long pandemic-induced hibernation, the group is hoping its

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