The Incredible Montana Connection, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

This week the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier marked 100 years. Did you know that there is an incredible Montana connection with the very first Tomb of the Unknown Soldier ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery?

The great Montana historian and retired US Navy Captain Ken Robison is the keynote speaker for a Veterans Day ceremony in Great Falls. I spoke with him Wednesday morning about the history of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, and the incredible Montana connection with the very first ceremony 100 years ago.

Ken Robison: The Crow Nation connection is fascinating because Chief Plenty Coups then about 71 years old, but the last of the traditional chiefs of the Crow Nation had been invited to represent all of Native Americans, all indigenous peoples throughout the country, and so he was there as an honored guest. And after President Harding gave his speech and the burial, the heads of state from many nations, the senior leaders left tributes, President Harding had left the Medal of Honor on the casket, and Chief Plenty Coups went up to the casket and laid his own war bonnet and his own coups stick, and on that coups stick was the first feather that plenty coup had earned in battle, symbolically starting him

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