The Easter revolution causes the tyrants of the world to tremble

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One of the distinctive marks of the Christian Gospels, something that separates them from all of the other religious literature of the world, is that they are conveying news. They are not simply musing about timeless spiritual truths or trading in moral wisdom; they are telling us about something that happened.  

Indeed, “gospel,” euangelion in the original Greek, has precisely the sense of glad tidings, good news. Unlike the sacred texts of the other great religions, the books of the New Testament have a grab-you-by-the-lapel quality, an urgency to communicate, not so much ideas however true and fresh, but an event that has turned everything upside down.  

And that revolutionary happening is the resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth from the dead.  

One of the most powerful arguments for the authenticity of the resurrection is the emergence of Christianity precisely as a messianic movement. (Kevin Ferris/Fox News Digital)

When I was going through university and seminary, there was a tendency to downplay the resurrection, interpreting it as a myth, a legend, a symbol that the cause of Jesus goes on. One of the most influential Catholic theologians of that period speculated that the disciples, after the death of their Lord, felt forgiven and then expressed this fact in vivid stories about appearances and the empty tomb.

EASTER SYMBOLS HELP REVEAL THE TRUE MEANING OF THE SEASON, SAYS CHRISTIAN WRITER

Thankfully, this manner of thinking has gone the way of all flesh. That sort of watered-down, anemic form of Christianity might have flourished in the faculty lounges of Western universities, but it has precious little to do with the New Testament and the witnesses to the resurrection.  

When someone is conveying a myth, he uses language such as “once upon a time,” or “in a galaxy far, far away,” precisely because he is not talking about actual events but, in a symbolic

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