Opinion | Why Voting Rights Isn’t (Usually) Bipartisan

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As the U.S. Senate grapples with voting rights legislation, some lawmakers and observers fret it would be a mistake for Democrats to protect voting rights on a party-line vote. This is a hesitation that I share: I run a nonpartisan organization that works to strengthen democracy, and we always aim for support from lawmakers from both parties.

However, I’ve spent years researching the history of the fight for voting rights, and I see a clear if unexpected pattern: Most of the time in U.S. history, voting rights were expanded by one party over the objections of the other. When it comes to

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