NFTs move to influence Congress, even if lawmakers have no clue what they are

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Non-fungible tokens, or NFTs, may be an industry deeply perplexing for much of the country. But those monetizing collectible digital assets have already begun playing the classic Washington game, turning to K Street to protect its interests before the government.

One of the largest companies in the NFT space—the Vancouver, Canada-based Dapper Labs, Inc.—became the first to federally register to lobby on issues related to NFTs, doing so in a public disclosure posted on Monday.

The filing comes as operatives and major players in cryptocurrency race to shape views among D.C. policymakers, who are trying to understand the burgeoning technology. A non-fungible token is a unique asset, often a photograph, video, or some kind of artwork, that exists on a digital ledger of transactions, known as a blockchain, that records who owns it. These assets are bought and sold with cryptocurrency.

While Congress has so far shied away from policy discussions

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