New federal rule moves to protect military bases from nearby land sales to foreign actors

In the wake of several controversies involving foreign actors attempting land purchases near sensitive U.S. bases, a new federal rule will expand a Treasury committee’s ability to control the transactions.

Lawmakers in Florida, North Dakota and elsewhere have long sounded the alarm over Chinese companies in particular, and now the Biden administration is taking steps to potentially make it more difficult for such purchases to go through.

The rule utilizes a 2018 law that gives the Treasury’s Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS) broader authority to study the implications of foreign investment in real estate transactions and asset transfers.

Nearly 60 military installations or related properties will be provided further protections under the new rule.

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Aerial view of Barter Island, Kaktovik, AK, where one base is located (Getty)

Some of the major installations cited include Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall (formerly Fort Myer) in Arlington, Va., Letterkenny Army Depot in Chambersburg, Pa., Cold Bay Regional Radar Site and Naval Support Facility Ketchikan in Alaska, Pueblo Chemical Depot in Colorado, Camp Blaz in Dededo, Guam and the Naval Logistics Support Annex in Okahumpka, Fla.

The latter was likely a concern of Florida Gov.

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