Michigan’s new congressional map: 3 battlegrounds, 1 Dem-vs.-Dem primary

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Michigan’s new congressional map likely sets up three battleground seats for the next decade, while teeing up a Democratic member-on-member clash between Reps. Haley Stevens and Andy Levin.

Michigan is on track to be much more hotly contested at the congressional level than during the previous decades, when just two seats switched party hands, both in 2018.

The state’s new independent commission approved one of its proposed maps on Tuesday, which will create battleground districts centered around the cities of Grand Rapids, Lansing and Flint. In a good year for the GOP, they could control as many as nine of the 13 districts. In an unfavorable environment for Republicans, that number could drop to four. Overall, the map creates seven districts that voted for now-President Joe Biden in 2020, and six that then-President Donald Trump carried last year.

It also immediately triggered a member-on-member primary between Stevens and Levin in the state’s new 11th District,

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