Michael Goodwin: Facebook is too big to regulate, too popular and too important for Congress to tackle

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The news that the Facebook whistleblower would tell her story to Congress electrified Washington and the tech giant’s critics. Senators from both parties were salivating and whistleblower Frances Haugen didn’t disappoint, with an incisive condemnation of how her former employer knowingly enticed children and young teens in an insatiable dash for cash. 

“There is no accountability” for Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s founder and CEO, said Haugen, who believes the company repeatedly lied about the content of its internal research. 

She released documents showing Facebook hid Instagram’s negative effects on teens’ mental health and revealed how it exempts popular ­users from rules, failed to block drug cartels and human traffickers from its platforms and said America’s ­national security was jeopardized. 

“The documents I have provided to Congress prove that Facebook has repeatedly misled the public,” Haugen said. “I came forward at great personal risk because I believe we still have time to act.” 

ZUCKERBERG SAYS IT’S ‘DEEPLY ILLOGICAL’ TO THINK FACEBOOK PUTS PROFIT AHEAD OF SAFETY, WELL-BEING

She was a compelling witness, and having told her story first to The Wall Street Journal and then “60 Minutes,” Haugen was able to shape her testimony into a simple morality play

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