Lincoln's Gettysburg Address offers inspiring message for our cancel culture times

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Abraham Lincoln got one thing very wrong on Nov. 19, 1863, while dedicating a new military cemetery at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, when he said the world “will little note, nor long remember what we say here.” 

The Gettysburg Address went down in history as perhaps the greatest speech given on American soil. Generations of school children have memorized and studied it. Let’s hope that tradition continues because it speaks to our nation and our future in ways few political documents do. 

The two-minute address came at a time when the North had grown weary of war. Lincoln used his brief remarks to explain why the Union must continue the fight. 

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He started with the now-famous words “Four score and seven years ago.” That poetic way of saying “eighty-seven years ago” took his audience back to 1776, the year of the Declaration of Independence, when “our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.” 

Lincoln had several things in mind at Gettysburg. For one, he knew the country was very young,

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