HART: It’s Like, Literally, Amazing How The English Language Has Devolved

Maybe I am getting old. I remember when TV and water were free and pornography cost money. I remember when LGBT meant a lettuce, guacamole, bacon and tomato sandwich. My generation can actually fly into an airport or eat a sandwich without posting it on Facebook.

We older folks are different from Millennials; they like to film themselves doing just about everything they do, including sex. I differ. When I am done with sex, the first thing I think to myself is, “Well at least no one had to see that.”

Now I’m certainly not a grammar-Nazi or a word-nerd, especially given the locker-room opinions I spew weekly (some would say “weakly”). But young people out there really need to focus on cleaning up their language, especially as it relates to overusing three words that are dumbing down the English language: “like,” “literally” and “amazing.”

For the 40-and-unders out there, you know how you use the word “like” in like every other sentence? Don’t!

When folks my age, those who can remember the TV show “Cheers,” interview you for a job, your use of the word “like” as some filler or crutch word is maddening to us. And when done in

View Source